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Thread: What else can reduce the risk of mosquito bites? It's what AndyNap said!

  1. #31
    KaraBrooks is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Sep 2002 Posts: 1,687
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinS View Post
    I wonder if anyone offers short-term rental of these larger propane-fueled devices?


    https://www.sbhonline.com/forums/threads/84818
    Kevin - We owned a couple of those in CT and, if my memory serves, they are not a short term fix but rather attract and trap the female mosquitos over time eventually reducing the mosquito population in the area. However, if a villa was using them consistently that might be a great thing!

  2. #32
    MIke R is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: May 2003 Stinson Lake - New Hampshire & Provincetown - Cape Cod Posts: 51,935
    Quote Originally Posted by KaraBrooks View Post
    Kevin - We owned a couple of those in CT and, if my memory serves, they are not a short term fix but rather attract and trap the female mosquitos over time eventually reducing the mosquito population in the area. However, if a villa was using them consistently that might be a great thing!

    We put up a half dozen bat houses and have quite a few resident bats on our property and our bug problem is significantly less on our property than the surrounding properties...a very noticeable difference when you go for a walk .....and they do all the work ...no propane needed...LOL
    "When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace" Jimi Hendrix

  3. #33
    stbartshopper is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Dec 2013 Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A. Posts: 9,169
    Zika preventative- keep your blood full of Gloriette's Rum!

  4. #34
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 44,028
    Looking at Picaridin products Walmart sells a few
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Natrapel-8....4-oz/46008105


    Andy

  5. #35
    ccg is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Dec 2009 Durham, NC Posts: 679
    This was sent out to all employees today. They should have just referred everyone to this post for information. It does have the link to the CDC and their travel info if anyone is interested.


    Duke officials have offered travel guidelines in the wake of news reports about the Zika virus that is spreading throughout Central and South America and the Caribbean.

    Dr. Cameron Wolfe in Duke's Division of Infectious Diseases said that Zika is a virus transmitted to humans via mosquito bites.

    "It is similar to Dengue Fever and is transmitted by the same mosquito," he said. "While no cases have been reported in North Carolina to date, incoming reports indicate that the virus has been actively transmitted in certain U.S. territories, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and has been identified in returning travelers in other states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued travel guidance regarding this mosquito-borne virus."

    According to the CDC, only about one in five people infected with the Zika virus will develop symptoms, which can include fever, rash, joint and muscle pains, and less commonly, headache and pain behind the eyes. The illness is usually mild, with symptoms lasting from several days to a week. The most significant concern is for pregnant women who become infected, as there is growing evidence that the Zika virus appears to be associated with microcephaly (small head and brain development) in newborns and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in women infected during pregnancy. The extent of pregnancy complications is a subject of continued research at this time.

    Because there are currently no vaccines or treatments for this virus, the only way to prevent infection is to avoid being bitten by infected mosquitos. Based on these circumstances, Duke officials have issued travel guidelines to those planning travel to impacted areas.

    "Women in any trimester of pregnancy should consider canceling or postponing travel to areas where the Zika virus is present," said Kyle Cavanaugh, vice president for adminstration and Duke's emergency coordinator. "If travel cannot be avoided, pregnant women should consult with their physician before their trip to discuss the risks of Zika and similar illnesses and should be sure to take strict precautionary measures to prevent mosquito bites. Additionally, until we know more about the virus and how it impacts pregnancy, women who are considering becoming pregnant should follow these same precautionary guidelines."

    Officials suggest the following steps to help prevent mosquito bites in impacted areas:

    • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
    • Use EPA-registered insect repellents as directed.
    • Insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, and IR3535 are safe for pregnant and nursing women and children older than 2 months when used according to their labels.
    • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (e.g. boots, pants, socks, and tents).
    • Stay and sleep in screened-in or air-conditioned rooms, and/or sleep under a mosquito bed net.


    Anyone who is pregnant and has traveled to a country reporting active transmission of Zika, the CDC recommends they see their physician for counseling and testing. The CDC interim guidelines for pregnant women and their health care providers are now available. Information and guidelines may change frequently as more information about the virus becomes known. For general updated information on Zika, go to http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.

    For additional information or clinical questions, members of the Duke community can contact one of the following resources:

    • Employee Occupational Health and Wellness (919-684-3136, option 2 and ask for employee resource nurse), or after hours use emergency hotline (919-684-8115).
    • Duke Student Health (919-681-9355).
    • The Division of Infectious Disease also has faculty members ready to assist in evaluating clinical situations. (on-call pager: 919-970-3885).
    "There are no foreign lands. It is the traveller only who is foreign" Robert Louis Stevenson
    House Divided - Roll Tide War Eagle

  6. #36
    amyb is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Apr 2008 Glen Cove,L. I., NY Posts: 26,739
    Thank you-good advice and good information.
    Remember Yesterday, Dream About Tomorrow, But Live Today.

  7. #37
    JLN is offline
    SBH New Member Joined: Apr 2016 Posts: 1

    Mosquitos and Thermacell

    Been using Thermacell in our DC backyard for years. Not perfect but keeps us almost entirely mosquito free while neighbors don't go out because of mosquitos.
    They had units plus cartridges at Oasis and Marche last year. Oasis is closed right now and I am told by StB native that it is not at Marche now. Airtravel with or shipping of butane cartridges is illegal.
    We had a large propane gizmo for a few years. Didn't work at all and were happy to sell it.
    Those of us who want our Thermacell better start asking stores in StB to carry it.
    Last edited by JLN; 04-03-2016 at 01:52 PM. Reason: added info

  8. #38
    Bart -my real name- is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Nov 2009 Alexandria, VA Posts: 5,175

    Re: Mosquitos and Thermacell

    Quote Originally Posted by JLN View Post
    Been using Thermacell in our DC backyard for years. Not perfect but keeps us almost entirely mosquito free while neighbors don't go out because of mosquitos.
    .
    Which one are you using, the green one pictured above?

    Do you think something like that would work while doing yard work......(moving around the entire year with this thing in your pocket)? We also get brutalized by mosquitos and I'd love to be able to work in a protected bubble instead of spraying down every time I went outside.

  9. #39
    stbartshopper is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Dec 2013 Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A. Posts: 9,169

    Re: What else can reduce the risk of mosquito bites? It's what AndyNap said!

    Picardin is not toxic if the spray is accidentally inhaled and it does not foul up surfaces such as fishing equipment and lines according to its literature.

  10. #40
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 44,028

    Re: What else can reduce the risk of mosquito bites? It's what AndyNap said!

    Quote Originally Posted by stbartshopper View Post
    Picardin is not toxic if the spray is accidentally inhaled and it does not foul up surfaces such as fishing equipment and lines according to its literature.
    Picaridin


    Andy

  11. #41
    sxmbeachlover is offline
    SBH Member Joined: Apr 2007 Littleton, Colorado Posts: 241

    Re: What else can reduce the risk of mosquito bites? It's what AndyNap said!

    I find this study/article a bit confusing. It talks all about DEET, but near the end Strickland gives the edge to Picaridin, as does Consumer Reports. We switched to Picaridin a year or so ago. Just sayin.

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