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Thread: MS Word box- iPad mini

  1. #1
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679

    MS Word box- iPad mini

    I use this box to post full articles with pictures. However, on the iPad Mini I am unable to complete the paste because the Full box with OK at the bottom doesn't appear. I have tried landscape but the bottom of the box still doesn't appear. I have tried pinching, expanding, everything but can't get the full box to appear.


    Andy

  2. #2
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695
    Same on the Maxi. I do two pastes -- delete the bottom on the first, repaste and delete the top. A bug for sure.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  3. #3
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695
    The paste as text box works fine -- able to see OK button and scroll through text
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  4. #4
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    I know but no photos tho


    Andy

  5. #5
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695
    Two step it. 911 out to JB b
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  6. #6
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    Quote Originally Posted by JEK View Post
    Same on the Maxi. I do two pastes -- delete the bottom on the first, repaste and delete the top. A bug for sure.
    I am not understanding. If you can't see the OK button how do you complete a paste


    Andy

  7. #7
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695
    Paste the entire clip. Delete the bottom half and the OK button appears. Paste again and then delete the top half and the OK button will appear.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  8. #8
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    Ah.


    Andy

  9. #9
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695

    One of the ways is to just copy less at a time and do multiple pastes

    Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap, Who Ousted U.S. From Vietnam, Is Dead


    • Hoang Dinh Nam/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

    • Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

    • Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

    • Romeo Gacad/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

    • Julian Abram Wainwright/European Pressphoto Agency





    • 1
    • 2
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    Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap, left, with Robert S. McNamara, the former defense secretary, in Hanoi in 1995.




    By JOSEPH R. GREGORY

    Published: October 4, 2013




    Vo Nguyen Giap, the relentless and charismatic North Vietnamese general whose campaigns drove both France and the United States out of Vietnam, died on Friday in Hanoi. He was believed to be 102.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  10. #10
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695

    Paste 2

    The death was reported by several Vietnamese news organizations, including the respected Tuoi Tre Online, which said he died in an army hospital.
    General Giap was among the last survivors of a generation of Communist revolutionaries who in the postwar decades freed Vietnam of colonial rule and fought a superpower to a stalemate. In his later years, he was a living reminder of a war that was mostly old history to the Vietnamese, many of whom were born after it had ended.
    But he had not faded away. He was regarded as an elder statesman whose hard-line views had softened with the cessation of the war that unified Vietnam. He supported economic reform and closer relations with the United States while publicly warning of the spread of Chinese influence and the environmental costs of industrialization.
    To his American adversaries, however, from the early 1960s to the mid-1970s, he was perhaps second only to his mentor, Ho Chi Minh, as the face of an implacable enemy, as ruthless with his own forces as he was with his opponents. To historians, his willingness to sustain staggering losses against superior American firepower was a large reason the war dragged on as long as it did, costing more than 2.5 million lives — 58,000 of them American — sapping the United States treasury and Washington’s political will to fight and bitterly dividing the country in an argument about America’s role in the world that still echoes today.
    A teacher and journalist with no formal military training, Vo Nguyen Giap (pronounced vo nwin ZHAP) joined a ragtag Communist insurgency in the 1940s and built it into a highly disciplined force that through 30 years of revolution and civil war ended an empire and united a nation.
    He was charming and volatile, an erudite military historian and an intense nationalist who used his personal magnetism to motivate his troops and fire their devotion to their country. His admirers put him in the company of MacArthur, Rommel and other great military leaders of the 20th century.
    But his critics said that his victories had been rooted in a profligate disregard for the lives of his soldiers. Gen. William C. Westmoreland, who commanded American forces in Vietnam from 1964 until 1968, said, “Any American commander who took the same vast losses as General Giap would not have lasted three weeks.”
    General Giap understood something that his adversaries did not, however. Early on, he learned that the loyalty of Vietnam’s peasants was more crucial than controlling the land on which they lived. Like Ho Chi Minh, he believed devoutly that the Vietnamese would be willing to bear any burden to free their land from foreign armies.
    He knew something else as well, and profited from it: that waging war in the television age depended as much on propaganda as it did on success in the field.
    These lessons were driven home during the Tet offensive of 1968, when North Vietnamese regulars and Viet Cong guerrillas attacked scores of military targets and provincial capitals throughout South Vietnam, only to be thrown back with staggering losses. General Giap had expected the offensive to set off uprisings and show the Vietnamese that the Americans were vulnerable.
    Militarily, it was a failure. But the offensive came as opposition to the war was growing in the United States, and the televised savagery of the fighting fueled another wave of protests. President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had been contemplating retirement months before Tet, decided not to seek re-election, and with the election of Richard M. Nixon in November, the long withdrawal of American forces began.
    General Giap had studied the military teachings of Mao Zedong, who wrote that political indoctrination, terrorism and sustained guerrilla warfare were prerequisites for a successful revolution. Using this strategy, General Giap defeated the French Army’s elite and its vaunted Foreign Legion at Dien Bien Phu in May 1954, forcing France from Indochina and earning him the grudging admiration of the French.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  11. #11
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    Are you serious? I can't get that much in the box and see the Ok button


    Andy

  12. #12
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695
    I did those two posts on my iPad.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  13. #13
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    I tried- doesn't work no matter how short the post is only the top 1/2 of the box appears at the bottom of the screen


    Andy

  14. #14
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695

    From my iPhone

    REAL ESTATE

    Russian mogul pays record $75M for Fifth Avenue co-op

    By Jennifer Gould Keil
    October 4, 2013 | 1:05am

    Modal Trigger


    1/11
    Dining room










    A historic mansion on Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue Gold Coast is in contract for $75 million — which would be the highest price ever paid for a co-op in the city, The Post has learned.
    The buyer of 828 Fifth Ave. is Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich and his stunning baby mama, Dasha Zhukova, a source said.
    The couple had been secretly eyeing the city’s top-priced town houses for the past year.
    They have two US-born children. Abramovich has five more with his ex-wife.
    The current record co-op price is the $54 million David Geffen paid for socialite Denise Rich’s pad at 785 Fifth Ave.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  15. #15
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    This is a much as I can get on my screen
    Attached Images Attached Images


    Andy

  16. #16
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695
    Possible user error IMO.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  17. #17
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    Thanks for the help


    Andy

  18. #18
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695
    Depends on the size of the content being copied. 911 out to JB.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

  19. #19
    JB is offline
    Administrator Joined: Jan 2008 Tucson AZ Posts: 383
    MS Word Paste Test

    World’s Highest Marginal Tax Rates, 2004-2012
    Click on the column heading to sort the table.

    Country 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    Aruba 60.1% 60.1% 60.1% 59% 59% 59% 59% 59% 59%
    Sweden 56.7% 56.8% 56.8% 56.8% 56.7% 56.7% 56.6% 56.6% 56.6%
    Denmark 59% 59% 59% 59% 62.3% 62.3% 55.4% 55.4% 55.4%
    Netherlands 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52%
    Spain 45% 45% 45% 43% 43% 43% 43% 45% 52%
    Austria 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%
    Belgium 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%
    Japan 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%
    Senegal 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%
    United Kingdom 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 50% 50% 50%
    Curaçao 57.2% 57.7% 49.4% 49.4% 49.4% 49.4% 49.4% 49.4% 49%
    Finland 53.5% 53.5% 51.4% 51% 50.7% 49.8% 49.6% 49.2% 49%
    Canada 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 48%
    Ireland 42% 42% 42% 41% 41% 46% 47% 48% 48%
    Israel 49% 49% 49% 48% 47% 46% 45% 45% 48%
    Norway 55.3% 51.3% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8%
    Sint Maarten 0% 0% 0% 0% 47.5% 47.5% 47.5% 47.5% 47.5%
    Portugal 40% 40% 42% 42% 42% 42% 45.9% 46.5% 46.5%
    Zimbabwe 46.4% 41.2% 36.1% 48.9% 48.9% 38.6% 36.1% 36.1% 46.4%
    Iceland 25.8% 24.8% 36.7% 35.7% 35.7% 37.2% 46.1% 46.2% 46.2%
    Australia 47% 47% 47% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45%
    China 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45%
    France 48.1% 48.1% 40% 40% 40% 40% 41% 41% 45%
    Germany 45% 42% 42% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45%
    Greece 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 45% 45% 45%
    Italy 45% 43% 43% 43% 43% 43% 43% 43% 43%
    Papua New Guinea 47% 47% 45% 42% 42% 42% 42% 42% 42%
    Luxembourg 39% 39% 39% 39% 39% 39% 39% 42% 41%
    Chile 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    Croatia 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 40% 40%
    Gibraltar 45% 45% 42% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    South Africa 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    Switzerland 40.4% 40.4% 40.4% 40.4% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    Taiwan 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    Korea (South) 36% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 38%
    Morocco 44% 44% 44% 42% 42% 40% 38% 38% 38%
    Thailand 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37%
    Argentina 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Cyprus 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 35% 35%
    Ecuador 25% 25% 25% 25% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Malta 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Turkey 40% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    United States 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Vietnam 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Venezuela 34% 34% 34% 34% 34% 34% 34% 34% 34%
    Colombia 35% 38.5% 38.5% 34% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33%
    New Zealand 39% 39% 39% 39% 39% 38% 35.5% 33% 33%
    Swaziland 33% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33%
    Mozambique 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32%
    Philippines 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32%
    Poland 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 32% 32% 32% 32%
    Guatemala 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31%
    India 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Indonesia 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Malawi 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Mexico 33% 30% 29% 28% 28% 28% 30% 30% 30%
    Peru 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Sierra Leone 35% 35% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Tanzania 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Uganda 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Average 30.1% 29.5% 29.2% 29.2% 29.3% 28.8% 29% 28.6% 28.9%
    Brazil 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5%
    Samoa 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27%
    Malaysia 28% 28% 28% 28% 28% 27% 26% 26% 26%
    Armenia 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 25%
    Bangladesh 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Botswana 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Dominican Republic 25% 25% 30% 29% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Egypt 34% 34% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 25%
    Honduras 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Jamaica 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 35% 25% 25%
    Latvia 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 23% 26% 25% 25%
    Panama 33% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 25% 25% 25%
    Uruguay 0% 0% 0% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Sri Lanka 30% 30% 30% 35% 35% 35% 35% 24% 24%
    Syria 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 22% 22% 22%
    Estonia 26% 24% 23% 22% 21% 21% 21% 21% 21%
    Afghanistan 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Fiji 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 20%
    Georgia 20% 12% 12% 12% 25% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Guernsey 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Isle Of Man 18% 18% 18% 18% 18% 18% 20% 20% 20%
    Jersey 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Lebanon 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Singapore 22% 21% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Slovakia 19% 19% 19% 19% 19% 19% 19% 19% 19%
    Angola 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 17% 17% 17%
    Ukraine 13% 13% 13% 15% 15% 15% 15% 17% 17%
    Hungary 38% 38% 36% 36% 36% 36% 32% 16% 16%
    Romania 40% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16%
    Costa Rica 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Czech Republic 32% 32% 32% 32% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Hong Kong 16% 16% 16% 16% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Lithuania 33% 33% 33% 27% 24% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Mauritius 30% 30% 30% 22.5% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Serbia 10% 10% 10% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Yemen 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 15% 15%
    Jordan 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 14% 14%
    Russia 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13%
    Belarus 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 12% 12% 12% 12%
    Macau 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12%
    Albania 25% 25% 20% 20% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
    Bosnia-Herzegovina 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 10% 10% 10% 10%
    Bulgaria 29% 24% 24% 24% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
    Macedonia 18% 24% 24% 12% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
    Bahamas 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Bahrain 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Bermuda 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Brunei Darussalam 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Cayman Islands 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Kuwait 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Oman 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Qatar 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Saudi Arabia 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    United Arab Emirates 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Country 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    Aruba 60.1% 60.1% 60.1% 59% 59% 59% 59% 59% 59%
    Sweden 56.7% 56.8% 56.8% 56.8% 56.7% 56.7% 56.6% 56.6% 56.6%
    Denmark 59% 59% 59% 59% 62.3% 62.3% 55.4% 55.4% 55.4%
    Netherlands 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52% 52%
    Spain 45% 45% 45% 43% 43% 43% 43% 45% 52%
    Austria 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%
    Belgium 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%
    Japan 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%
    Senegal 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50%
    United Kingdom 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 50% 50% 50%
    Curaçao 57.2% 57.7% 49.4% 49.4% 49.4% 49.4% 49.4% 49.4% 49%
    Finland 53.5% 53.5% 51.4% 51% 50.7% 49.8% 49.6% 49.2% 49%
    Canada 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 46.4% 48%
    Ireland 42% 42% 42% 41% 41% 46% 47% 48% 48%
    Israel 49% 49% 49% 48% 47% 46% 45% 45% 48%
    Norway 55.3% 51.3% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8% 47.8%
    Sint Maarten 0% 0% 0% 0% 47.5% 47.5% 47.5% 47.5% 47.5%
    Portugal 40% 40% 42% 42% 42% 42% 45.9% 46.5% 46.5%
    Zimbabwe 46.4% 41.2% 36.1% 48.9% 48.9% 38.6% 36.1% 36.1% 46.4%
    Iceland 25.8% 24.8% 36.7% 35.7% 35.7% 37.2% 46.1% 46.2% 46.2%
    Australia 47% 47% 47% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45%
    China 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45%
    France 48.1% 48.1% 40% 40% 40% 40% 41% 41% 45%
    Germany 45% 42% 42% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45%
    Greece 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 45% 45% 45%
    Italy 45% 43% 43% 43% 43% 43% 43% 43% 43%
    Papua New Guinea 47% 47% 45% 42% 42% 42% 42% 42% 42%
    Luxembourg 39% 39% 39% 39% 39% 39% 39% 42% 41%
    Chile 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    Croatia 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 45% 40% 40%
    Gibraltar 45% 45% 42% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    South Africa 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    Switzerland 40.4% 40.4% 40.4% 40.4% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    Taiwan 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40%
    Korea (South) 36% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 38%
    Morocco 44% 44% 44% 42% 42% 40% 38% 38% 38%
    Thailand 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37%
    Argentina 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Cyprus 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 35% 35%
    Ecuador 25% 25% 25% 25% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Malta 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Turkey 40% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    United States 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Vietnam 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 35% 35% 35% 35%
    Venezuela 34% 34% 34% 34% 34% 34% 34% 34% 34%
    Colombia 35% 38.5% 38.5% 34% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33%
    New Zealand 39% 39% 39% 39% 39% 38% 35.5% 33% 33%
    Swaziland 33% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33% 33%
    Mozambique 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32%
    Philippines 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32% 32%
    Poland 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 32% 32% 32% 32%
    Guatemala 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31%
    India 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Indonesia 35% 35% 35% 35% 35% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Malawi 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Mexico 33% 30% 29% 28% 28% 28% 30% 30% 30%
    Peru 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Sierra Leone 35% 35% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Tanzania 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Uganda 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 30%
    Average 30.1% 29.5% 29.2% 29.2% 29.3% 28.8% 29% 28.6% 28.9%
    Brazil 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5% 27.5%
    Samoa 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27%
    Malaysia 28% 28% 28% 28% 28% 27% 26% 26% 26%
    Armenia 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 25%
    Bangladesh 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Botswana 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Dominican Republic 25% 25% 30% 29% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Egypt 34% 34% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 25%
    Honduras 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Jamaica 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 35% 25% 25%
    Latvia 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 23% 26% 25% 25%
    Panama 33% 27% 27% 27% 27% 27% 25% 25% 25%
    Uruguay 0% 0% 0% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25%
    Sri Lanka 30% 30% 30% 35% 35% 35% 35% 24% 24%
    Syria 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 22% 22% 22%
    Estonia 26% 24% 23% 22% 21% 21% 21% 21% 21%
    Afghanistan 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Fiji 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 31% 20%
    Georgia 20% 12% 12% 12% 25% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Guernsey 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Isle Of Man 18% 18% 18% 18% 18% 18% 20% 20% 20%
    Jersey 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Lebanon 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Singapore 22% 21% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
    Slovakia 19% 19% 19% 19% 19% 19% 19% 19% 19%
    Angola 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 17% 17% 17%
    Ukraine 13% 13% 13% 15% 15% 15% 15% 17% 17%
    Hungary 38% 38% 36% 36% 36% 36% 32% 16% 16%
    Romania 40% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16% 16%
    Costa Rica 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Czech Republic 32% 32% 32% 32% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Hong Kong 16% 16% 16% 16% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Lithuania 33% 33% 33% 27% 24% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Mauritius 30% 30% 30% 22.5% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Serbia 10% 10% 10% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15%
    Yemen 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 15% 15%
    Jordan 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 14% 14%
    Russia 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13%
    Belarus 30% 30% 30% 30% 30% 12% 12% 12% 12%
    Macau 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12%
    Albania 25% 25% 20% 20% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
    Bosnia-Herzegovina 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 10% 10% 10% 10%
    Bulgaria 29% 24% 24% 24% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
    Macedonia 18% 24% 24% 12% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
    Bahamas 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Bahrain 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Bermuda 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Brunei Darussalam 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Cayman Islands 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Kuwait 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Oman 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Qatar 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    Saudi Arabia 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
    United Arab Emirates 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%


    Read more: http://www.gfmag.com/tools/global-da...#ixzz2gwYig6Ti
    Under Creative Commons License: Attribution Share Alike


    Notes:
• 0.0% = No personal income taxes are levied.
• For countries that tax sections of income at different levels, only the top level is presented.
    • All tax rates are for residents.
• With the exception of Switzerland where the figure quoted includes the Zurich cantonal and communal rate, Canada where the figure quoted includes Ontario's provincial rate and Sweden, Finland and Iceland where the figures quoted include average rate across municipalities, amounts reported do not include state/provincial rates (i.e. the amount reported for the US represents the highest personal income tax rates charged at a federal level only).
• No other taxes have been included (such as social security tax, employment tax, etc.). The exception includes Sweden, Denmark (2003-2007 rates only) and Norway where the rates include a social security component




    More than 100,000 residents in Switzerland have signed a petition demanding that the government ensure a minimum monthly income of nearly $2,800 (2,500 Swiss francs) for all adults in the country.

The 120,000 signatures are enough to formally call a vote in the government over whether or not to approve the “CHF 2,500 monthly for everyone" (Grundeinkommen)” funding proposal.

For comparison, the average U.S. worker earned $3,769 in pre-tax, monthly salary in 2011. Food service industry workers earned $1,785 in pre-tax income during the same period.

MSN reports that in a public display of support, advocates tipped over a truck full of 8 million five-cent coins in front of the Swiss capital on Friday, one coin for each of the country’s citizens.

    A formal date has yet to be set for the vote but it could come as early as this year, pending guidance from Swiss government.
    Funding for the proposed measure would come out of the Swiss social insurance system, which already guarantees universal health care coverage for its citizens, along with other benefits designed to uphold the country’s social safety net.
    Because of the relatively low threshold for forcing votes on referendum driven issues, Switzerland typically votes on several public measures each year.
    For example, on November 24th, the country will vote on a separate measure that would limit executive pay to the same amount paid to a company’s lowest paid staff member.
    The so-called 1:12 initiative has received support from the Swiss government’s Social Democrat bloc.
    At least one of Switzerland’s biggest CEO’s has said if the measure passes, he would consider moving his company out of the country .

    Conveniently located at the airport offering a wide selection of vehicles for long or short term rentals. Maurice Rental Cars provides 24-hour-a-day, 7 days a week personalized assistance to our customers In St Barth's. If you have any kind of problem, we'll take care of it day or night. Renting with Maurice rental cars you can be assured of personal, responsible service during your vacation to St Barts.

    ]

    JB

  20. #20
    JB is offline
    Administrator Joined: Jan 2008 Tucson AZ Posts: 383
    I guess kelly is going to get an iPad for a present today.

    Some forum formatting and styles will change to make these boards more responsive to tablets and mobile devices.

    hard-hat.jpg

  21. #21
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    Thanks JB. I figured it out. If I leave the keyboard up I can pull the whole box up. If I clear the keyboard I can't.

    Egypt Warns Protesters Will Be Treated As Foreign Agents Ahead Of Sunday's Military Celebrations

    Reuters | Posted: 10/05/2013 12:51 pm EDT | Updated: 10/05/2013 1:41 pm EDT









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    GET WORLD NEWSLETTERS:SUBSCRIBE





    FOLLOW:

    Egypt, Egypt Protests, Egypt Protests, Egypt Celebrations, Egypt Foreign Agents, Egypt Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt Muslim Brotherhood Crackdown, Egypt Protest Crackdown, Egypt Protesters, Egypt Protesters Foreign Agents, Reuters, World News





    By Michael Georgy

    CAIRO, Oct 5 (Reuters) - Egyptian authorities said on Saturday anyone who protests against the army on Sunday when the country celebrates the anniversary of an attack on Israel forces during the 1973 war will be regarded as agents of foreign powers.

    Presidential spokeman Ahmed al-Muslimani was speaking to the state news agency in anticipation of demonstrations by the Muslim Brotherhood, which has been staging protests against the army's ouster of Islamist President Mohamed Mursi in July.

    Egyptian authorities tightened security around the country after clashes on Friday killed at least four people.

    Mursi's supporters on Friday mounted their boldest demonstrations since troops crushed protest camps demanding his reinstatement on Aug. 14. The four who died in Cairo were all Brotherhood supporters, security sources said.

    Both opponents and supporters of the Brotherhood have called for more mass protests on Sunday, during celebrations of the anniversary of an Egyptian attack on Israeli forces in the Sinai during the 1973 war.

    "Protesters against the army on the anniversary of victory (Oct. 6, 1973 war) will be carrying out the duties of agents, not activists," the presidential spokesman said. "It is not befitting to go from a struggle against authorities to a conflict with the nation."

    The Interior Ministry said security had been stepped up on highways, in all cities and at important installations.

    Political tensions have gripped Egypt and hammered the economy since the army ousted Mursi, installed an interim government and drew up a political road map it promised would bring fair elections.

    In a televised speech to the nation, Interim President Adly Mansour promised that a constitution would be written to accommodate "all Egyptians". He said free and fair parliamentary and presidential elections would be held shortly after the constitution is finished.

    On Saturday afternoon, about 1,000 Mursi supporters tried to reach the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque area in northeast Cairo, where security forces crushed one of their protest camps in August. All but about 50 were turned back by police, who fired tear gas, security sources said.

    Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said in a meeting with aides that security forces would not tolerate attempts to block roads or "spread chaos", the state news agency reported.

    "The ministry will deal with the utmost firmness and decisiveness with any of those practices, and confront any lawlessness," it quoted him as saying.


    "EVIL ELEMENTS"

    The military boosted its presence around Tahrir Square - where hundreds of thousands of Egyptians demonstrated during the revolt that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011 - after clashes on Friday in several cities.

    Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi said in a statement to the nation that "evil elements" still posed a danger but had lost much of their power, a reference to Islamist militants.

    Beblawi said the road map was "taking its natural course" and that he hoped it would conclude soon. He said the economy was starting to improve and "there were clear signs and reassuring indicators".

    Authorities have cracked down hard on the Brotherhood, which won every election after Mubarak's fall but became unpopular during Mursi's rule, with many Egyptians accusing him of trying to acquire sweeping powers and mismanaging the economy, allegations he denies.

    The Brotherhood accuses the military of staging a coup and sabotaging democracy by removing Mursi, the country's first freely-elected president.

    On Aug. 14, Egypt's military-backed authorities smashed the two pro-Mursi sit-ins in Cairo, with hundreds of deaths, and then declared a state of emergency and imposed a curfew. Many of the Brotherhood's leaders have been arrested since.

    Egyptian authorities face a rising number of attacks by militants in the Sinai, bordering Israel and the Gaza Strip, which is controlled by the Palestinian group Hamas, an offshoot of the Muslim Brotherhood.

    Fears are growing that an Islamist insurgency could take hold in other parts of Egypt, a key U.S. ally which has a peace treaty with Israel and controls the Suez Canal, a vital global trade route.

    In September, a Sinai-based militant group inspired by al Qaeda claimed responsibility for a failed suicide bombing against the interior minister in Cairo.


    Andy

  22. #22
    JB is offline
    Administrator Joined: Jan 2008 Tucson AZ Posts: 383
    OK.

    When you paste from word do you use the "paste from word" icon or are you just pasting into the message field?

  23. #23
    andynap is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 43,679
    I use the Word icon


    Andy

  24. #24
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 51,695
    Looks like it is fixed

    ABC News



    Debt ceiling, government shutdown talks finally begin: Is the endgame near?
    CBS News - ‎11 minutes ago‎
    Share

    The White House and House Republicans have committed to talking about ways to avoid a default on U.S. debt, the first concrete sign of a potential compromise since the government shut down 11 days ago.


    Video and Photos


    News Feed


    House GOP, White House seeking end to budget fight
    Boston.com - ‎9 minutes ago‎


    White House Open to Short-Term Hike in Debt Limit
    ABC News - ‎Oct 7, 2013‎


    Government Doors Closed, but Workers May Get Paid
    ABC News - ‎Oct 5, 2013‎






    In Depth


    Debt ceiling, government shutdown talks finally begin: Is the endgame near?
    CBS News - ‎12 minutes ago‎

    The White House and House Republicans have committed to talking about ways to avoid a default on U.S. debt, the first concrete sign of a potential compromise since the government shut down 11 days ago. The looming question is whether a short-term ...






    The Marius 100th Birthday Party -- June 5, 2023

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