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Thread: Laura has now the same eye infection I had in New York (it's not 100% back to normal yet). We can now do a bad comparison of getting healthcare in the US and Europe ;-)1) Getting to the doctor.US: Th

  1. #1
    Petri is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Jan 2004 Helsinki, Finland Posts: 7,968

    Healthcare comparison ;-)

    Laura has now the same eye infection I had in New York (it's not 100% back to normal yet). We can now do a bad comparison of getting healthcare in the US and Europe ;-)

    1) Getting to the doctor.
    US: The doctor was on call and available at the office in 45 minutes, 20 minutes walk from the hotel
    FI: A bit busy day, just went to the reception and got to see the doctor in 30 minutes, 20 minutes drive from home to the city
    The US doctor didn't wear a white coat ;-)

    2) Cost of doctor.
    US: $200 (127e)
    FI: 51e ($80)
    Not fair as such, US doctor was on-call service and there wasn't 24h reception as such. FI doctor was at private medical care who have 24x7 reception. Hotel concergience vs. local knownledge. Both were outside of normal working hours.

    3) Medicin
    US: Eye drops with two antibiotics
    FI: Eye drops with antibiotics, another tablet antibiotics prescription as well
    She is allergic to certain antiobiotics that may have effected the medicin

    4) Cost of medicin
    US: $30 (19e)
    FI: 16e ($25) for the eye drops, 3e (5$) for the antibiotics after 42% government subsidize

    .. doesn't really tell anything ;-) It would have been interesting to have used some sort of public healthcare in both cases.

  2. #2
    andynap is online now
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 45,184

    Re: Healthcare comparison ;-)

    Quote: " It would have been interesting to have used some sort of public healthcare in both cases"

    Not here you don't.


    Andy

  3. #3
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 55,598

    Re: Healthcare comparison ;-)

    Quote: " It would have been interesting to have used some sort of public healthcare in both cases"

    Not here you don't.
    Unless you are indigent and go to the ER. I think that qualifies for public healthcare as they don't charge and always treat.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party Memorial -- June 5, 2023

  4. #4
    Petri is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Jan 2004 Helsinki, Finland Posts: 7,968

    Re: Healthcare comparison ;-)

    Quote: " It would have been interesting to have used some sort of public healthcare in both cases"

    Not here you don't.
    I used the local public health care recently.

    About a month ago I was doing some yard work and while mowing the lawn, my nose started to bleed. It stopped, started again, a few repeats and eventually I realized that this wouldn't stop by itself and it was getting pretty bad. I took a taxi to the private medical center and their 24x7 reception as it was already outside of working hours on friday evening.

    The private care gave some medicin to increase clotting and the usual tricks to ice. After an hour it was still bleeding and they decided to send me to public healthcare.

    I took another taxi ride to the nearby hospital and their nose/ear unit. There was an urgent child case coming in from another city so I had to wait about an hour before they could take a look at me. The troubled vain was quite deep in the nose and took some effort to burn, and they filled the area with some sponge that would disappear itself. I needed to wait and watch TV for another hour to see that the bleeding had stopped. I'm supposed to get 20e (31$) bill for the visit but I haven't got it yet.

    Over here it's basicly a combination of public and private health care. You do dental and the basics on the private side to save time (even the public dental service gives vouchers that you use on the private side), the specials on the public side. Many doctors do a few days on the private sector and a few days on the public sector, using the latter to educate themselves.

  5. #5
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 55,598

    Re: Healthcare comparison ;-)

    This is what happens when you don't have a public dental program . . a local philanthropist funded this.


    washingtonpost.com

    Easing W.Va.'s Ache for Care
    Volunteer Dentists Treat More Than 1,100 in Two-Day Event

    By Ben Hubbard
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Sunday, June 29, 2008; C07

    HEDGESVILLE, W.Va., June 28 -- Some came with cracked teeth. Others described theirs as rotten. One man chipped his while eating ice. Another -- improbably -- while eating a cheeseburger.

    "I thought there was a piece of bread caught in my teeth," said Jeff Coonrod, 37, of Charles Town, W.Va. "So I tried to get it out, and there was nothing there."

    Most hadn't been to the dentist in at least five years. All cited the same reasons: too expensive, no dental insurance, ignored it until it hurt.

    Through a free dental clinic organized by the United Way and the Virginia Dental Association, all they needed to get care in this small town 90 miles northwest of the District was a little patience.

    More than 300 were in line when Berkeley County's Hedgesville High School opened at 6 a.m. Saturday for the second and final day of the Mission of Mercy. Some had waited since midnight. Others had had teeth pulled or repaired the day before and had come back for more work. More than 1,100 people were treated during the two days, said Terry Dickinson, executive director of the Virginia Dental Association. An army of 700 volunteers from Berkeley and the surrounding counties transformed the high school into a MASH-like dental facility.

    Nurses took vital signs by hallway lockers. Dentistry students in the school's trophy-adorned foyer poked about in patients' mouths and sent them off for X-rays, repair work or dreaded extractions.

    Such was the lot of 29-year-old Mike Waugh of nearby Berkeley Springs, W.Va. Sitting under a basketball hoop on the edge of the gym floor, crowded with 50 volunteer dentists, their assistants and tools, he talked about the four teeth he thought he was about to lose.

    "On a pain scale from one to 10, the past couple of nights have been a 10," he said. In the past, he'd broken his leg, his hand and his finger, but none, he said, hurt as much as his teeth.

    "It's unbearable," he said. "Your leg, you can prop it up. You can't prop your mouth up."

    Waugh's work as a self-employed floorer supports his wife and four children, he said, but doesn't bring in enough for health insurance, much less dental care. His wife earns $8 an hour in day care. She, too, gets no benefits.

    A volunteer escorted him to a chair. The dentist looked at his folder and said he'd pull four teeth. Waugh leaned back and opened wide. The dentist reached for the forceps.

    Dickinson said he organized the first Mission of Mercy in July 2000 after leaving his private practice in search of "something more." He has since helped organize 37 clinics, mostly in Virginia, but also in Texas, Kansas, Iowa and other states. The Hedgesville clinic, his first in the state, was funded by a $36,000 grant from a local philanthropist.

    Dickinson estimates that the mass clinics can serve each patient for $15. This is substantially less than the $450 to $500 he said is the average for dental visits. He estimates that the 1,100 people going through the clinic in two days will have gotten more than $500,000 worth of care.

    Why would so many wake up before dawn for dental care?

    "There are a lot of low-income people, and dentistry is expensive," said Richard Meckstroth, a professor of dentistry at the University of West Virginia who was volunteering yesterday.

    Another reason is that the number of local dentists has failed to keep pace with rapid population growth.

    "So the dentists are swamped with people who can pay, and those who can't are stuck," Meckstroth said.

    The problem is compounded by the lack of support for young dentists opening practices, he said. Establishing a new, fully equipped office can cost more than $100,000, a sum beyond the reach of most recent dentistry grads.

    The mass clinics provide a valuable service, he said, but he hopes for more systematic care.

    "This isn't the way to do this," he said. "This is only 1,000 people, and there's lots more who need this kind of care."

    After an hour in the chair, the efforts of two dentists and an assistant had left Waugh's mouth two teeth poorer. The third tooth finally yielded to the pliers, and Waugh drew an open hand across his throat to show that he'd had enough. The fourth tooth he was worried about was not one he had to lose.

    The dentist gave Waugh some pointers on helping his mouth heal, handed him his folder and wrote a prescription for Tylenol with codeine. The anesthetic would wear off in a few hours, he said.

    Near the exit, a volunteer gave Waugh some gauze for his gums and toothbrushes for him and his children. He wrote a thank-you note in a book for the clinic's funder, put an ice pack to his cheek and said he had to get home for his son's 7th birthday party.

    "But I'm afraid I won't eat no birthday cake today," he said.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party Memorial -- June 5, 2023

  6. #6
    Petri is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Jan 2004 Helsinki, Finland Posts: 7,968

    Re: Healthcare comparison ;-)

    First I looked just the picture and thought it was from China..

  7. #7
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 55,598

    Re: Healthcare comparison ;-)

    First I looked just the picture and thought it was from China..
    I know what you mean. An embarrassment to the USA.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party Memorial -- June 5, 2023

  8. #8
    andynap is online now
    SBH Insider Joined: Oct 2002 Philadelphia Posts: 45,184

    Re: Healthcare comparison ;-)

    First I looked just the picture and thought it was from China..
    That's why I said not here.


    Andy

  9. #9
    NYCFred is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Jan 2004 NYC Posts: 17,596

    Re: Healthcare comparison ;-)

    Two patients limp into two different medical clinics with the same complaint. Both have trouble walking and appear to require a hip replacement. The first patient is examined within the hour, is x-rayed the same day and has a time booked for surgery the following week. The second sees the family doctor after waiting a week for an appointment, then waits eighteen weeks to see a specialist, then gets an x-ray, which isn't reviewed for another month and then, finally, has his surgery scheduled for 6 months from then.

    Why the different treatment for the two patients?

    The first is a golden retriever, the second is a man.
    Neutral and Witty.

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