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Thread: World Mosquito Day, Not a good thing!

  1. #1
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 57,001

    World Mosquito Day, Not a good thing!

    The Marius 100th Birthday Party Memorial -- June 5, 2023

  2. #2
    amyb is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Apr 2008 Glen Cove,L. I., NY Posts: 30,264

    Re: World Mosquito Day, Not a good thing!

    I can believe that.
    Remember Yesterday, Dream About Tomorrow, But Live Today.

  3. #3
    JEK is offline
    Senior Insider Joined: Jan 2004 In the ether . . . Posts: 57,001

    Re: World Mosquito Day, Not a good thing!

    Bill Gates Says This Is the World's Deadliest Animal and the Data Shows He's RightIt causes a million deaths a year. Innovation could improve those numbers.


    The world's deadliest animal is not the great white shark, or the grizzly bear, or even the moose. It's so small you can easily flick it away or even squash it. Yet the mosquito, by spreading pathogens, kills more than a million people every year, and sickens hundreds of millions more. To underscore just how dangerous they are, Bill Gates released his mosquito-related posts during what he's dubbed "Mosquito Week," a takeoff on Shark Week. "Mosquitoes and the diseases they carry kill more people in one day than sharks kill in 100 years," Gates noted in an email to his blog subscribers.
    The worst thing by far that people catch from mosquitoes is dengue fever, which kills 20,000 people a year and makes another 400 million sick. But there's also the Zika virus, West Nile virus, chikungunya and yellow fever. What many of us think of as an annoying summertime pest can actually be a deadly threat, especially in tropical climates.
    What is Gates doing about it? Strangely enough, he's supporting a program that's breeding more mosquitoes and releasing them in 11 countries, mostly in Southeast Asia and South America. These mosquitoes are infected with Wolbachia bacteria, which blocks them from transmitting the diseases that kill people. As the lab-raised mosquitoes breed with other mosquitoes, Wolbachia spreads through the mosquito population, making them decidedly less deadly. In a pilot program in Indonesia, releasing Wolbachia mosquitoes cut dengue fever infections by 77 percent. People may be getting just as many itchy mosquito bites as they were before, but fewer of them are dying.
    For obvious reasons, Gates writes, the idea of breeding mosquitoes and releasing them to bite unsuspecting people didn't go over well at first. But the results of the pilot have been impressive enough that now the biggest challenge is breeding enough Wolbachia mosquitoes to supply all the places that want them.
    Using sugar to kill mosquitoes.
    We all know that mosquitoes love human blood and we have the bumpy, itchy bites to prove it. But, it turns out, mosquitoes need sugar throughout their lives so they can have enough energy to fly, whereas only mosquito mothers seeking food for their larvae seek human blood.
    So another initiative Gates calls out in his blog is one that uses a simple combination of sugar and insecticide to attract and then kill mosquitoes. The bait is behind a membrane only mosquitoes can penetrate, so while it may attract other, more beneficial insects such as bees or butterflies, it won't kill them. The baits are inexpensive to produce, small, lightweight, and easy to nail to an outside wall, Gates writes.
    Right now, the sugar baits are at the development phase. Research shows that, combined with the bed netting and indoor insecticides already in common use, sugar baits could significantly reduce mosquito populations around homes, and thus reduce the incidence of malaria by 30 percent in places where it is widespread. There were 241 million cases of malaria and 627,000 deaths from it in 2020, and those numbers keep rising, so a 30 percent reduction could save hundreds of thousands of lives. Who knows? Maybe someday we'll all have them hanging outside our homes.
    The Marius 100th Birthday Party Memorial -- June 5, 2023

  4. #4
    Claradais4 is offline
    SBH New Member Joined: Oct 2022 Posts: 5

    Re: World Mosquito Day, Not a good thing!

    I read in an article here about home made mosquito trap with sugar1 cup of water1/4 cup of brown sugar1 gram of yeast1 2-liter bottleCut the plastic bottle in half. Mix brown sugar with hot water. Let cool. When cold, pour in the bottom half of the bottle. Add the yeast. No need to mix. It creates carbon dioxide, which attracts mosquitoes. Place the funnel part, upside down, into the other half of the bottle, taping them together if desired. Wrap the bottle with something black, leaving the top uncovered, and place it outside in an area away from your normal gathering area. (Mosquitoes are also drawn to the color black.)Change the solution every 2 weeks for continuous control.

  5. #5
    amyb is offline
    SBH Insider Joined: Apr 2008 Glen Cove,L. I., NY Posts: 30,264

    Re: World Mosquito Day, Not a good thing!

    Bad mosquito day in Lurin..l have decided to read indoors
    Remember Yesterday, Dream About Tomorrow, But Live Today.

  6. #6
    AvecChampagne is offline
    SBH New Member Joined: Jan 2023 Posts: 4

    Re: World Mosquito Day, Not a good thing!

    Do the mosquitos go down in January? I do reasonably well here on the East Coast of the US (and we live in a pretty wooded area) but I was eaten alive last Christmas in the Dominican Republic ��

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